In part 1 we discussed obesity, several health risks and tips for successful weight management. Have you started making small changes for a healthier, energetic and stronger you? how about incorporating your indoor or outdoor exercise routine to include your pet(s)? Dogs and cats need physical as well as mental stimulation in their daily schedule, your dog’s specific exercise requirements will depend on breed, age, health and size (seek your vet’s advice). As a general rule, try to spend at least 30 minutes each day engaged in some sort of activity with your dog. Outdoor cats get plenty of exercise, while 10-15-minute playtime session each day is sufficient for indoor cats.

Exercise suggestions for dogs (based on physical ability and veterinary advice):

  • Regular walks, longer and brisker walks
  • Jogging or running alongside a cycling owner (special leads maybe required)
  • Fetching toys and ball games
  • Swimming and hydrotherapy
  • Nose games and interactive dog toys
  • Dogs with active minds and lots of energy to burn, consider agility trials and obedience training

Exercise suggestions for cats (based on physical ability and vet’s advice):

  • Harness and lead walks
  • Cat exercise wheel
  • Playing with toys
  • Catch the light with a laser
  • Hide and seek (cardboard boxes and paper bags)
  • Obstacle courses (in the house and garden)
  • Encourage cats to run up and down stairs

Your puppy/kitten and older pet will also need exercise but of the gentle variety, if you skip a day here and there, they will cope but if you miss too many walks or play-time, your pet might remind you and be constantly under your feet. Starting consistent exercise or increasing existing exercise will ensure you and your pet are on the right track for a brand new you and a healthier pet!

If you’d like to discuss home pet care services in Sydney, contact Melina on 0403 939 202 or Enquiries@PetNurture.com.au. We want to make sure your pet(s) are a step closer to better health.

Bibliography

Jones, E. M. (2007). BSAVA Manual of Practical Veterinary Nursing (2007 ed.). Quedgeley, Gloucester, UK:British Small Animal Veterinary Association p21-23.

weekly, A. W. (2002). Caring for Cats&Dogs. Sydney, NSW, Australia: ACP Books. p102-103, p46-48 Retrieved December 12, 2016

 

Disclaimer: This Individual article is based upon the opinion of the respective author, who retains full copyright. This information is not intended as medical advice. There are several veterinary practices specialising in Diet & Nutrition including Weight Loss, we would encourage you to make your own pet health care decisions based upon your research and in corporation with a qualified pet health care professional.

 

 

 

 

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